THE ARTS SOCIETY CHELTENHAM
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DateLecture
14 November 2017Foreigners in London 1520-1677: the artists that changed the course of British Art.
12 December 2017Celebration in Ancient Egyptian art
09 January 2018The Elgin Marbles: a history of meaning
13 February 2018The Wilton Diptych and the artistic culture of Richard II’s reign
13 March 2018History of the Medici: bankrolling the Renaissance
10 April 2018Twentieth Century Women Gardeners
08 May 2018Buckingham Palace: its history, occupants and contents
12 June 2018Underground Castles: the architecture of the London Underground above and below street level

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Foreigners in London 1520-1677: the artists that changed the course of British Art. Lesley Primo Tuesday 14 November 2017

Why were foreigner painters preferred by the aristocracy in London to native-born English painters, why did foreigners come in the first place, what was their motivation, and what was the impact of foreigners in London on English art and art practise?

The lecture will look at the various formats and uses of art, tracing foreign artists from the Tudor period through to the Renaissance and Baroque, looking at their origins and how they came to work in England. It will examine the contributions of artists such as Holbein, Gerrit van Honthorst, Marcus Gheeraerts the younger, Lucas and Susanna Horenbout, Isaac Oliver, Paulus van Somer, van Dyck, Peter Lely, and Rubens. This lecture will look at how these artists influenced the British School of painting and assess their legacy.

Lesley Primo holds a BA in Art History and an MA in Renaissance Studies from Birkbeck College, University of London. Visiting Lecturer in Art History at the University of Reading in 2005 and 2007. He gives lectures and guided tours, plus special talks, at both the National Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery, also lectures at the City Literary Institute, and has presented a series of talks at the National Maritime Museum and the Courtauld Institute.